RE: AWP 17 / Feb 8 – 11 / Washington, DC

Hello.

We need to begin talking about this upcoming event. We need to begin getting more books. There were many left from our 2016 debut in Los Angeles but as you may well already know the doors here are always open.

For those who need more info: DLC solicits books from authors aligned with Disability Literature movement. Crip Lit. The Crip Lit cannon. All are welcome here.

We ask that you send us books which we in turn sell at book fairs such as AWP. We give you the option of either donating sales proceeds to the DLC or having us cut you a check for books sold. And lastly we ask that you let us know what to do with books that do not sell. Hold on to them for the next event? Donate them? Return them to you? Email for more info: dislit666@gmail.com.

No we do not get paid for this.

Monies that the DLC generates – either from book sales or Kickstarter campaigns – goes the purchasing the next AWP Booth. Or shipping a lot of books from one part of the country to another. Purchasing a Square CC reader for these events because the first one got lost…somehow.

One other thing and this has nothing to do with AWP but everything to do with making this Disability Literature Consortium site bigger/better/badder: we would like the Resources page to be really well rounded. Send us info about blog sites, CripLit author sites, presses, etc., that should be referenced here.

Cheers.

RE: AWP 17 / Feb 8 – 11 / Washington, DC

Zoeglossia: For Emerging Writers

These middle months of summer are a time when many writers who support themselves by teaching or working in educational institutions take advantage of the break provided by the school year to seek out writers’ retreats where they can devote some serious attention to developing their writing.  While retreats for writers abound, it is a pretty safe bet that no many of them are created with the object of developing the field of disability literature.  Poets Jennifer Bartlett and Sheila Black, whose work is widely recognized in the disability literary community, are hoping to chip away at this lack of opportunity through the recent launching of Zoeglossia.

 

In Black and Bartlett’s words:

“Zoeglossia is a non-profit that implements and fundraises to support an annual four-day retreat for emerging writers with disabilities, called “Zoeglossia.” The retreat involves professional development of attendees by prominent, established writers with disabilities. This  includes writing workshops, lectures, panel discussions and literary readings. The emerging writers with disabilities who attend are selected competitively based on their writing and their expenses at the retreat are  covered in order to facilitate participation. Writers selected attend the retreat three times over a five-year period to attain the credential of “fellow.” While people with disabilities are the largest minority group in America (20% of the population), writers with disabilities are vastly underrepresented in academia in general, and specifically in publishing, creative writing programs and the organizations that govern the field.“

 

While Zoeglossia is still in the process of establishing itself, its first foray into public presence will occur on July 30 when it takes part in the New York City Poetry Festival.  Bartlett, together with poets Kathi Wolfe, Anne Kaier and others will be reading on the festival’s Chumley Stage at  11 AM.  (For more information about the festival see: New York City Poetry Festival.) Bartlett and Black have already demonstrated their ability to pull together the work of established writers with disabilities in their ground-breaking anthology, Beauty is A Verb: The New Poetry of Disability.  Zoeglossia, with its emphasis on providing opportunities for emerging writers, seems the next logical step.

Zoeglossia: For Emerging Writers

Deaf Poet’s Society Release Manifesto

The site is live – yes. Issue One has yet to be unleashed. But an aggressive and bold manifesto has been published:

Deaf Poet’s Society Manifesto

Believe me – this will be one of the better pieces you read over the next several months…years.

 

Deaf Poet’s Society Release Manifesto